japan, japanese, kyushu, okinawa

Okinawa: From Naha To Nago

How can you spend so much time in Japan without ever touching ground in the Ryukyu archipelago? You can’t! This first part is set on the main Okinawa island.

How can you spend so much time in Japan without ever touching ground in the Ryukyu archipelago? You can’t! Here I am, on a 2 weeks road-trip with Anselme to tackle the islands. This first part is set on the main Okinawa island.

Naha

We arrive to Naha after a two and a half hour flight from Tokyo. It’s easy to come by, but plane tickets are not cheap! But why don’t we treat ourselves to enjoy Japan with some warmer weather? Well… in November 😉

Naha Red Light District

The first hours promptly gets us in the Okinawa atmosphere : we’re still in Japan, the care for service is the same, the language –up to a few words, like in any Japanese prefecture- is similar, everything is clean… only, the Japanese people seems different! More relaxed, even totally open-minded about their own turf, they speak a notch louder but, we must comply, they’re friendly and awesome. We really feel comfortable, on vacation.

Naha Vending Machines

The restaurant chains that usually stand off in Tokyo are seemingly less evident here; however, there are local izakayas everywhere. The happy surprise on this trip is that the local delicacies are excellent. I did expect it, but not that much!

The meals have the common bases as those of the mainland, looks pretty much the same too, but the tastes are completely out of this world. Certainly, gōya (bitter vegetable we can find everywhere) isn’t here for nothing : ) Depicting the local cuisine is the chanpurū dish (which the basics contains parboiled gōya with tofu or meat) and it is a good introduction to this gastronomy. Yet I think it’d be mistaken to award importance to this dish which is far less evocative and elaborated than any other dish we’ve tasted.

Tree House Restaurant Naha

Above is the Tree House Restaurant which we can find approximately in the center of Nara : here the hang-in-the-tree theme can surprise you but the prices are somewhat high and the food isn’t any fancier or better than any places around. And the fact of the matter is… it’s not a real tree. Zannen.

Below is a pretty nice guest-house (Minshuku Agaihama), very cheap (2000¥ per bed per night), with a perfect welcome. It’s not very hard to find lodging in Okinawa but if asked, I can provide a list. ; )

Guest House Naha

The Second World War destroyed most of Naha city, which deeply suffered. Don’t expect to find Meiji or even Edo era ryokans here, old onsens or wooden houses all around… no, it’s a concrete place, sadly, because the island have a long history and there is still some strong Chinese feeling, more than anywhere in Japan.

The Vending Machine and the Haikyo

I consider Naha less a destination than a spot from which to access some other places. There is some things to see, but is the city really worth to come to? Frankly, not really. There are so many other things to see in the Okinawa islands and on the main island to only spend your time in Naha. Life here is certainly good but we are hedonist adventurers and we must get over the urban walls. I will bring you to visit some places with us. Below is the Kokusai street (shops, restaurants, bars…).

Naha Night

Another difference in Okinawa is the drinks. The vending machines sells some different selection of cans, the common beer is Orion (don’t order Asahi here, even if it’s excellent), and the sake… nihonshu… you’d better get drunk with Awamori (Strong Okinawan sake), or Habushu, its counterpart containing habu (viper)!

Habushu in Naha

With this brief Okinawa introduction, let’s now go in a small izakaya to savor some sashimis… and what can we find right in the middle of the plate? You see on the upward left some small bubbles? This is Umibudo : very delicious seaweed best served with some soy sauce. We spent an awesome evening along with Japanese tourists from Kansai.

Sashimi in Naha

Tsuboya District

I didn’t expect Naha to be especially bucolic –it’s the Ryukyu Islands capital after all- but I thought it’d be a little bit more idyllic, like some places we can find in Tokyo, relatively attached to the past. Thankfully, Tsuboya district is; so it’s definitely my favourite.

Okinwacat Is Hot

Tsuboya (tsubo : pot + ya : local dialect specialist) is the place where all the pottery production of the Ryukyu was centralized in the 17th century. In 1970, everything is relocated to alleviate air pollution caused by the ovens in Naha city. Today, we only find renowned shops, small restaurants and dwellings.

Naha Soba

I don’t have any specific interest for pottery, but the shops are refreshing, we can find a lot of awesome objects (tough very expensive) and the best of omiyage (gift for friends) are those big shīsā which are used as house roof ornaments.

We take a slow-pace stroll, walking on the limestone blocks, following the paths that squeeze through and throughout the heights of Tsuboya. There are some pottery shops where we can stop by and do our own creations. There is also, interestingly, some cute cats wandering in front of a soba restaurant… very cute! Mandatory break.

This Cat Likes Soba

Tough the local soba are, to my taste, a little bit bland, the setting is so heart-warming that we take a halt there without pondering about the time flowing. The curious cats come to see us, and mostly try to mull over our meal; I share unanimously.

Pottery Shop in Naha

Naha is mainly constructed with horrible concrete buildings in order to cope with the typhoons (you see the one at the back on the right?), while Tsuboya neighborhood alleviates the pressure and allows us to live the Okinawa experience while being in this city. We enjoyed our visit.

Tsuboya District

You see, if you’re passing by Naha, Tsuboya is my recommendation. A fabulous spot, quite small, but we can spend hours there, dreaming.

Shuri Castle

We then walk towards the Shuri Castle, former quarters of the royal Ryukyu kingdom.

Colorful Shisa

On a 300 meters hill over the sea level, we can have a good view on Naha city. We could swear seeing Arcachon city afar. The overview is stunning with the wavy wall and the blue/green contrasts.

View from Shuri Castle

The Shuri castle is brand spanking new, very red (sorry, *vermilion!), and the visitors jostles in. Everything looks overrated, not surprisingly : it has been completely rebuilt in 1996. Its past is troubled because it has been razed 5 times, notably, the last time, by the treacherous Americans during the Second World War.

Shuri Castle

It’s also the biggest wooden structure of Okinawa and we can walk within bare feet. Lovely but somewhat swift, crowded, and something’s missing.

Imperial Marine Underground Headquarters

It’s impossible to talk about Naha and Okinawa without mentioning the Okinawa war, the last battle of the Second World War. The Imperial Marine underground headquarters has then been the stage of a horrid event, showing a country that lost every hope to win the war.

Japanese Navy Underground HQ

This work is 450 meters of tunnels, hand dug in a short period of time under the American invasion treat. At the end of the war, when everything was lost, the Imperial Marine commander of Okinawa committed suicide along with his 4000 men. We find there rooms with chips of bombshells or grenades, cavities from the bullets; A really dreadful modern mass-seppuku.

Japanese Navy Underground Headquarters

Here we go. To switch subject, I suggest we eat an Okinawan pizza. We can find them in many izakayas, they’re small but excellent. We’ll have the opportunity to taste another pizza further on.

Pizza in Okinawa

You want to see ruins, haikyo? Aya, okay! 😉

The Nakagusuku Ruins

Built in the 15th century, the Nakagusuku castle is the best-preserved one in Okinawa. The fortress was built by the Gosamaru lord to gain protection against the snaky Awamari, who reigned East and attempted everything to take over the throne.

Nakagusuku Castle Ruins

Breathe; you’re in the Ryukyu kingdom!

Nakagusuku Castle Entrance

The castle consist of 3 citadels, the structure is in an incredibly great shape after such time; Proof that the need of putting concrete everywhere is null.

Nakagusuku Castle

Behind the Nakagusuku castle lies the most popular haikyo of Okinawa : the shell of a giant hotel! It was meant to welcome the visitors to the Expo ’75 but was never completed. It stands off completely from the castle: they are two major ruins that thrive on the same hills but with a completely different style.

Nakagusuku Haikyo

It’s the first haikyo visit for Anselme and he was really glad. However, I will not detail this haikyo here but you will obviously find it on haikyo.org (my 100% Haikyo Website website) soon. Let’s now go towards Nago, on the northern side of Okinawa island.

The Secret Beach of Nago

We find ourselves in Nago vicinity, closer to the beaches, the resorts and the famous aquarium. We find there affordable lodging which the very welcoming owner shows us a point on a map. “Go there, it’s my secret place!”, so we head there on the spot.

Nago Secret Beach

The place is definitely very quiet, nobody there, no parking, we access this place with a small path in between the groves, but we got told to continue and explore further away than the secret beach.

Nago Secret Spot

Those are our first aching adventures in the Ryukyu lands. We always think Okinawa as heavenly white beaches but reality is slightly different : the islands are composed of sharp sedimentary rocks (mainly limestone from the coral reefs) that hurt our feet.

On another hand, the limestone is efficiently used to build roads, castles and houses and is highly responsible for the Okinawa look.

Today, cement is commonly used instead for its solidity and easy maintenance. The limestone was easily crumbling and there was always “habu” (the snake we have in the sake) haunting the walls made out of it.

Okinawa Spiky Rocky Beach

This place is wonderful. It’s a nice rock form we can find in some places on the Okinawan coasts. Many thanks to our host!

The Churaumi Aquarium

This recent aquarium (2002) is a pure pleasure. 4 floors of fishes, crazy lighting, everything is elegantly made.

Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium

I’m generally not very interested in aquariums (I prefer to eat those creatures, whales, dolphins.. : P ), but I was curious to see the “Kuroshio Sea” with my own eyes. It’s the main aquarium and its dimensions are 22 meters long and 8 meters high. The sight is so beautiful we dare not leave.

Okinawa Aquarium

No comments.

Okinawa Aquarium Fish

Believe me, do not think of setting foot on Okinawa without ever visiting the Aquarium! And if you’re in Japan, and you like aquariums, it’s worth it to come down to Okinawa for the weekend only for the Aquarium!

The Pizza in the Sky

Who ever dreamt of eating a pizza in the skies? No jokes! Here we are, the fabulous marketing idea of this pizza shack located on top of a mountain is hard to avoid; and not only for us, but also for all the strangers and Japanese tourists who come here and wait in line. It is quite hard to figure out the way to come here but it looks not to be a hurdle for anybody.

Shisa of the Pizza in the Sky

After an hour wait (out of season!), we are settled outside. Everybody is tailor dressed, the weather is wonderful, and the ambiance and the setting is lovely.

Pizza Cafe Kajinhou

This is the simplest pizza shack in the entire world : there is only one type of pizza (small or large, 1000¥ or 2000¥) and a salad. The pizza is salami, peppers and garlic. There is no choice to be made except for the drinks.

The pizza is very good even if the setting is probably the thing doing it good. More than a restaurant, it’s a nice tourist spot. If you want to go there, it’s here.

Jordy Meow & Anselme in Okinawa

Visiting the Okinawa main island is interesting without being a total stand out experience. The Chinook presence in the sky over Naha is somewhat demoralizing and that’s when you don’t have a bunch of F15 or F22 fighters. I’m really not a fan of the American presence and all this concrete which constantly gives a bitter feeling. The kingdom looks to be stuck between two eras and not being able to breathe freely… for now! Our trip in the islands goes further and the best is yet to come…

Article translated by センチレール ミッチ.

Okinawa : De Naha à Nago

Promenade à travers les meilleurs spots de l’île principale d’Okinawa, entre Naha et Nago.

Comment passer autant de temps au Japon sans ne jamais avoir foulé le sol des Îles Ryūkyū ? Me revoilà donc reparti pour un road-trip de 2 semaines avec Anselme pour rattraper ça. Cette première partie se déroule sur l'île principale d'Okinawa.

Naha

Arrivée à Naha après 2 heures et demi d'avion de Tokyo. C'est très facile d'accès mais les tickets ne sont pourtant pas donnés ! Mais qu'est-ce que l'on ne ferait pas pour apprécier un Japon avec quelques degrés de plus ? Du moins… en Novembre 😉

Naha Red Light District

Les premières heures nous plongent très vite dans l'ambiance d'Okinawa : nous sommes bien au Japon, le sens du sens du service est le même, le language – à quelques mots près comme dans toute bonne préfecture japonaise – est similaire, tout est propre… seuls les Japonais eux-mêmes semblent transformés ! Plus relax, voir carrément baroudeurs sur leur propre domaine, ils parlent aussi un peu plus fort mais sont, il faut l'avouer, plus sympathiques et chaleureux. On se sent vraiment en vacances, à l'aise.

Naha Vending Machines

Les chaînes de restaurants qui habituellement sautent aux yeux à Tokyo ont l'air un tout petit peu moins présente ici, par contre on trouve des izakayas locaux partout. La bonne surprise de ce voyage c'est que la bouffe locale est excellente. Je m'y attendais, mais pas à ce point !

Les plats ont la même base que ceux que l'on trouve sur le continent, se présente aussi un peu de la même manière, mais les goûts sont totalement différents. Bien-sûr, le gōya (légume très amer que l'on retrouve partout) n'y est pas pour rien 🙂 Le plat représentatif de la gastronomie locale est le chanpurū (justement à base de gōya sauté avec de la viande et du tofu) et il est une bonne introduction à cette cuisine. Je pense néanmoins que c'est une erreur de donner de l'importance à ce plat qui est loin d'être aussi élaboré et excellent que tous les autres auxquels nous avons goûtés…

Tree House Restaurant Naha

Ci-dessus, voici le Tree House Restaurant que l'on trouve en plein Naha, ou presque : ici. Le thème du restaurant perché dans l'arbre peut impressionner mais c'est malheureusement un peu cher, la nourriture n'est pas plus original ou meilleure qu'ailleurs, et le pire c'est que… ce n'est pas un vrai arbre.

Ci-dessous, c'est une guest-house très sympa (Minshuku Agaihama), vraiment pas chère (2,000Y le lit / nuit) et avec un accueil parfait. Il n'est vraiment pas difficile de trouver des logements à Okinawa, mais si on me demande alors j'en ferai la liste 😉

Guest House Naha

Naha est une ville qui a beaucoup souffert pendant la Seconde Guerre Mondiale et elle fût détruite presque totalement. Ne vous attendez pas à trouver ici de vieux ryokan de l'ère Meiji ou Edo, des onsens antiques, des maisons de bois à perte de vue… non, ça reste très béton-bitume. Dommage car l'île possède une longue histoire derrière elle et on ressent toujours la force de ses origines chinoises, plus qu'ailleurs.

The Vending Machine and the Haikyo

Je considère Naha comme un hub d'accès à d'autres endroits qu'une véritable destination. Il y a bien-sûr des choses à y voir, mais la ville vaut-elle vraiment le déplacement ? Je vais être franc : pas forcément. Il y a trop de choses à voir dans les îles d'Okinawa et sur le reste de l'île principale pour rester trop longtemps à Naha. La vie y est agréable, certes, mais nous sommes de vrais baroudeurs hédonistes et nous nous devons d'aller explorer au delà des murailles urbaines. Je vais vous emmener visiter quelques endroits avec nous. Ci-dessous, la rue de Kokusai (shopping, restos, souvenirs, bars…).

Naha Night

Une autre différence se trouve dans les boissons. Les distributeurs vendent des canettes différentes, la bière de base est la bière Orion (n'allez pas commander une Asahi à Okinawa, même si elle est excellente), et le saké… et bien le saké… saoulez-vous plutôt à l'Awamori (le saké d'Okinawa, très fort) ou mieux… sa version avec de l'habu, de la vipère : l'Habushu !

Habushu in Naha

Après cette petite introduction sur Okinawa, partons dans un petit izakaya apprécier quelques sashimis… et que trouve t-on au milieu du plat ? Vous voyez ces sortes de petites bulles au fond à gauche ? C'est de l'Umibudo, une algue qui est délicieuse avec un peu de sauce soja. On a passé une super première soirée aux côtés de touristes Japonais du Kansai.

Sashimi in Naha

Tsuboya District

Je ne m'attendais pas à ce que Naha soit particulièrement bucolique – ça reste la capitale des Îles Ryūkyū après tout – mais un peu plus idyllique, comme certains endroits que l'on trouve dans Tokyo et qui fleurent encore bon le passé. Heureusement, le District de Tsuboya est là pour ça. Définitivement mon coup de cœur.

Okinwacat Is Hot

Tsuboya (tsubo = pot, ya = spécialiste dans la langue locale) est le lieu où fût centralisée toute la production de poterie des Îles Ryuku au 17ème siècle. En 1970, tout est relocalisé pour éviter que l'air de Naha ne soit pollué par les fours. Aujourd'hui, on n'y trouve plus que de magasins très réputés, des petits restaurants, et des habitations.

Naha Soba

Je n'ai pas vraiment d'intérêt particulier pour la poterie, mais les magasins sont rafraîchissants, on y trouve plein d'objets très sympas (quoique très chers) et le summum de l'omiyage (du cadeau à ramener aux amis) ce sont ces gros shīsā dont on se sert pour décorer le toît des maisons.

Nous marchons tranquillement sur les pavés de calcaire et nous suivons les chemins qui se faufilent ça et là dans les hauteurs de Tsubaya. Il y a quelques ateliers à poterie où l'on peut faire ses propres créations, mais surtout il y a de jolis chats qui flirtent devant un restaurant à soba… très mignon ! Arrêt obligatoire.

This Cat Likes Soba

Ce sont des sobas locaux, plutôt fades à mon goût, mais l'ambiance est tellement agréable que l'on reste là sans vraiment voir le temps passer. Les chats, curieux, viennent nous voir, et tentent surtout de picorer dans nos plats. Je partage volontiers.

Pottery Shop in Naha

Naha étant principalement construite d'horrible immeubles de bétons pour pouvoir résister aux typhons (vous le voyez celui du fond à droite ?), Tsuboya permet de respirer et de vivre l'experience "Okinawa" un peu mieux tout en restant à Naha. Nous sommes ravis d'y être passé !

Tsuboya District

Vous l'avez compris, Tsubaya est ma recommendation si vous passez par Nara. Un coin fabuleux et même si c'est petit, on peut y passer des heures à rêvasser…

Shuri Castle

On marche ensuite vers le Château de Shuri, l'ancienne résidence royale du royaume de Ryuku.

Colorful Shisa

Situé sur une colline à 300 mètres au dessus du niveau de la mer, on peut y apprécier une vue sur la ville de Naha. On croirait presque reconnaître la ville d'Arcachon au loin 😉 Le panorama est magnifique avec sa belle muraille gondolée et ses beaux contrastes bleus-verts.

View from Shuri Castle

Le Château de Shuri est flamboyant neuf, rouge à souhait (pardon : vermillion !), et les visiteurs se bousculent dans sa cour. Tout semble un peu surfait, et ce n'est pas bien étonnant : il a été complètement reconstruit en 1996. Son passé est difficile puisqu'il fût détruit pas moins de 5 fois, dont la dernière par les Américains lors de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale.

Shuri Castle

C'est aussi la plus grande structure de bois d'Okinawa et on peu s'y promener pieds nus à l'intérieur. Agréable, mais un peu rapide, trop de monde, et il manque quelque-chose d'original à l'atmosphère.

Quartier Général Souterrain de la Marine impériale

Il est impossible de parler de Naha et d'Okinawa sans mentionner la Guerre d'Okinawa, la dernière grande bataille de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale. Le Quartier Général Souterrain de la Marine Impériale est le théatre d'un évènement particulièrement glauque, violent, mais finalement représentatif d'un Japon qui a perdu tout espoir de gagner la guerre.

Japanese Navy Underground HQ

Ce souterrain c'est 450 mètres de tunnels creusés à la main en très peu de temps sous la pression de l'invasion américaine. À la fin de la guerre, alors que tout est perdu, le commandant de la Marine Impériale d'Okinawa s'y suicide avec 4,000 de ses hommes. On trouve des salles avec des éclats d'obus de grenades ou encore les creux laissés par des balles. Vraiment effrayant ce dernier mass-seppuku moderne.

Japanese Navy Underground Headquarters

Voilà. Je vous propose de manger une pizza d'Okinawa, histoire de se changer les idées. On les retrouve un peu partout dans les izakayas, elles sont petites mais excellentes. Nous aurons l'occasion de déguster une autre pizza un peu plus bas.

Pizza in Okinawa

Vous voulez voir des ruines ? Ok, ok.

Les Ruines de Nakagusuku

Construit au 15ème siècle, le Château de Nakagusuku est le mieux préservé d'Okinawa. La forteresse fût construite par le Seigneur Gosamaru pour se protéger du perfide Awamari, qui régnait à l'Est et tentait tout et n'importe quoi afin de s'approprier le trône.

Nakagusuku Castle Ruins

Respirez, vous êtes dans le Royaume de Ryūkyū !

Nakagusuku Castle Entrance

Le château se compose de 3 citadelles, la structure est dans un état incroyable après si longtemps. Comme quoi il n'y a pas besoin de mettre du ciment partout 😉

Nakagusuku Castle

Derrière le Château de Nakagusuku se cache le haikyo le plus populaire d'Okinawa : le squelette d'un hôtel titanesque ! Il devait être construit pour accueillir les visiteurs de l'Expo '75 mais il ne fût jamais terminé. Il contraste très bien avec le château : ce sont deux ruines d'envergure qui épousent les mêmes collines mais dans un style totalement opposé.

Nakagusuku Haikyo

C'est le premier haikyo pour Anselme et il a vraiment adoré la visite. Je ne présenterai toutefois pas ce haikyo ici, mais vous le retrouverez bien-sûr sur le site haikyo.org. Partons maintenant vers Nago, plus au nord de l'île d'Okinawa.

La Plage Secrète de Nago

On se retrouve dans les environs de Nago, un peu plus près des plages, des resorts et du fameux aquarium. On trouve un logement très peu cher dont le propriétaire, très chaleureux, nous indique un endroit sur une carte. "Allez-y, c'est mon endroit secret !" nous dit-il. Il ne nous en faut pas plus, départ immédiat !

Nago Secret Beach

Le lieu est définitivement très calme, il n'y a pas un chat, pas de parking, l'accès se fait par un petit chemin qui serpente entre les arbres. Mais on nous a dit de continuer et d'explorer au delà de la plage secrète…

Nago Secret Spot

Ce sont nos premières aventures douloureuses dans les Terres Ryukyu. On imagine trop souvent Okinawa comme des plages paradisiaques de sable blanc mais la réalité est assez différente : les îles sont composées de roches sédimentaires (essentiellement du calcaire provenant des récifs coraliens) bien aiguisés qui font terriblement mal aux pieds !

D'une autre côté tout ce calcaire est utilisé à bon escient pour la construction des routes, des chateaux et des maisons, et il est responsable en grande partie de l'apparence d'Okinawa.

Aujourd'hui, bien-sûr le ciment est utilisé à la place car il est bien plus solide et facile à maintenir. Le calcaire s'ébruitait trop facilement et l'on y retrouvait souvent le dangereux serpent "le habu" (celui que l'on re trouve maintenant dans le saké) hantant les mûrs qui en était fait…

Okinawa Spiky Rocky Beach

Cet endroit est magnifique. C'est une splendide formation rocheuse comme l'on peut en trouver un peu partout sur les côtes d'Okinawa. Merci à notre hôte !

L'Aquarium de Churaumi

Cet aquarium assez récent (2002) est un véritable bonheur. 4 étages de poissons, des éclairages fous, tout est mis en scène avec élégance.

Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium

Je ne suis pas spécialement intéressé par les aquariums en général (je préfère vraiment manger toutes ces choses là, surtout les baleines… ah, je rigole, pardon, pardon), mais j'étais curieux de voir le Kuroshio Sea de mes propres yeux. C'est l'aquarium principal et il fait 22 mètres de longueur sur 8 mètres de hauteur. Le spectacle est de toute beauté et nous n'avons pas envie de partir.

Okinawa Aquarium
Okinawa Aquarium Fish

Croyez-moi, il est impensable de poser le pied sur l'île d'Okinawa sans aller visiter l'aquarium ! Et si vous aimez les aquariums et que vous êtes au Japon, ça vaut vraiment le coup de venir à Okinawa passer le week-end rien que pour ça.

The Pizza in the Sky

Qui n'a jamais rêvé de s'envoyer en l'air en mangeant une pizza ? Sans rire ! Nous y voilà, le marketing flamboyant de cette pizzéria située au sommet d'une montagne est difficile à ignorer; et pas que nous, mais pour les nombreux étrangers et touristes Japonais qui se trouvent aussi ici, à faire la queue. L'endroit n'est vraiment pas évident à trouver mais ça n'a l'air de rebuter personne.

Shisa of the Pizza in the Sky

Après une heure d'attente (en basse saison !), nous sommes installés dehors. Tout le monde est assis en tailleur, il faut beau, une vue imprenable, l'ambiance est idéale.

Pizza Cafe Kajinhou

C'est la pizzeria la plus simple du monde : il n'y a qu'une seule pizza (petite ou grande, pour 1,000 ou 2,000Y) et une salade. La pizza c'est toujours salami, poivrons, ail. Il n'y a pas le choix. Sauf pour les boissons.

La pizza est très bonne, même si l'ambiance y fait probablement pour beaucoup. Plus qu'un restaurant, c'est réellement un spot touristique très sympa. Si vous voulez y aller faire un tour, c'est ici.

Jordy Meow & Anselme in Okinawa

La visite de l'île principale d'Okinawa est intéressante, sans être un dépaysement total. La présence de Chinook dans le ciel au dessus de Naha est légèrement déprimante, et ça c'est quand vous n'avez pas un ballet de F15 ou de F22. Je ne suis pas fan du tout de cette présence américaine et de ce surplus de béton qui laissent tout les deux constamment un goût amer. Le royaume donne l'impression d'être coincée entre deux époques, et de ne pas être libre de respirer correctement. Pour l'instant ! Quand à nous, notre voyage dans les îles continue, et le meilleure reste encore à venir…

Continuez l'aventure avec une histoire d'amour dans les îles de Zamami, ou encore avec une visite fleurie de mon île préférée, Taketomi.